Courses

SIE 454A/554A: The Systems Engineering Process (upper division/graduate core course)

Covers processes and tools for engineering large-scale, complex systems including architecture, requirements, risk management, evaluation criteria, concept exploration, decision making, tradeoff studies, life-cycle models, decomposition, system coupling, test, verification, validation, system modeling, business process re-engineering, sensitivity analysis, teamwork, process maturity and documentation.

SIE 464-564 Cost Estimation (upper division/graduate elective)

Focuses on principles of cost estimation and measurement systems with specific emphasis on parametric models. Approaches from the fields of hardware, software and systems engineering are applied to a variety of contexts (risk assessment, judgment & decision making, performance measurement, process improvement, adoption of new tools in organizations, etc.). Material is divided into five major sections: cost estimation fundamentals, parametric model development and calibration, advanced engineering economic principles, measurement systems, and policy issues.

HNRS195I-018 The Science of Baseball (Freshman honors seminar)

America's pastime is a wonderful laboratory for understanding concepts in physics, biology, and psychology.  The common language to explain these phenomena is mathematics.  In this seminar we will explore unique characteristics of baseball such as the trajectory of a baseball in flight (via geometry), center of mass of the batter (via mechanics), and sabermetrics (via statistics).  Recent movies such as Moneyball (2011) and 42 (2013) have popularized social issues in baseball.  We will discuss the implications of these movies on STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics) education and the impact that baseball can have on academic achievement of secondary school students.

Previous knowledge or amazing physical ability are not required.  However, part of this seminar will involve detailed analysis of the Arizona Science of Baseball curriculum (http://baseball.engr.arizona.edu/) being developed for elementary and middle schools.  Students will be expected to be active participants in the discussions, make contributions to the Science of Baseball Curriculum, and present their observations at the end of the semester.  Guest speakers will supplement the discussions and a field trip will enhance our analysis of baseball.